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The sub-point Service > Settings > Network connections allows you to configure all external network connections for the ToolScope. The ToolScope supports connections in the Windows network as well as to FTP- and SFTP-servers. All network connections set up here can be used within the ToolScope.

To set up a new network connection, you must first select a name for it (in the example, "Server" was selected as the name). The name itself has no influence on the parameters of the network connection and is used only for easier identification of the connection at a later time. After you have chosen a name, click on "Add new connection" to continue with the configuration.

 

 

There are 3 different types of network protocols that are supported.

 

 

The below figure shows an example of a network connection with a Windows networks server. The parameters for the network connection can be obtained from your IT department.

The Windows network protocol is based on the SMB protocol from Microsoft. It's the basic way of connecting with a Windows OS.

 

Server address: The actual network address you want to connect with.You can also use the Windows network name of the network device. [IPv4 and IPv6 adresses are allowed]

Username: The account name you want to access with to your network device.

Password: The password of you user account.

Subdirectory: The directory path where you want to save your files. Default is the base directory. [Default means empty field]

Port / Domain: The windows domain name of your network.

 

 

The below figure shows an example of a network connection with a FTP server. The parameters for the network connection can be obtained from your IT department.

FTP stands for File Transfer Protocol and is a very basic network protocol that was specified in 1985. This is why it's known for being unsafe.

 

Server address: The actual network address you want to connect with. [IPv4 and IPv6 adresses are allowed]

Username: The account name you want to access with to your network device. You can also login as anonymous user. There for simply use "anonymous" as "Username" and leave "Password" empty.

Password: The password of you user account.

Subdirectory: The directory path where you want to save your files. Default is the base directory. [Default means empty field]

Port / Domain: The port you want to access with to your Server.

 

 

The below figure shows an example of a network connection with a SFTP server. The parameters for the network connection can be obtained from your IT department.

SFTP stands for SSH File Transfer Protocol and is basicly the same as FTP but mutch safer.

 

Server address: The actual network address you want to connect with. [IPv4 and IPv6 adresses are allowed]

Username: The account name you want to access with to your network device.

Password: The password of you user account.

Subdirectory: The directory path where you want to save your files. Default is the base directory. [Default means empty field]

Port / Domain: The port you want to access with to your Server.

 

 

Press "Remove connection" to delete the displayed network connection. Press "Test connection" to check that the parameters entered are correctly.

 

 

How to choose Subdirectory:

 

When you login into a Windows network device, you'll enter the base directory. This would look like this:

[\\192.168.1.97]

 

 

 

So if you would like to set the "Protokolle" folder as saving directory, you'd have to use "/Protokolle" as Subdirectory. This would be equal to this folder then:

[\\192.168.1.97\Protokolle]

 

 

 

Tests and troubleshooting:

 

If the message "Connection test failed (timeout)" occurs you know that your configuration is wrong. Please check  your configurations again and / or contact your IT.

If you are using the Windows network protocol, you'll might be unable to connect to the server IP address even though ping works. In this case you should check your DNS server settings. Because Windows network requests always need a valid DNS address to connect with. Otherwise the SMB protocol might crash or being very slow. Samba (Windows network client) doesn't work

 

 

After a success connection you should be able to access your new network device. On a Windows you can simply open a explorer and tipe in the network adress or the windows network name as folder path to access your device.  ("//192.168.1.97" in this example) If you got the File manager licence it should look like this:

 

 

It's also possible to save your setting via network.

 

 

Extended:

 

To check if your network connection works you can simply open the comand line of Windows or Linux and tipe in "ping" plus the IP adress you want to test. So in this example its "ping 192.168.1.90". The picture below shows a failed ping test. This would mean that you PC can't reach any device under the 192.168.1.90 adress. Please check your PC network connection or show this to your IT.

 

 

The picture below shows how it looks like when a ping test succeeded. This would mean that you PC is able to connect to the tested IP. Means you probably did something wrong inside your network configuration.

 

 

At the end i want to show you a program that scans your subnet for clients. It is called Angry IP Scanner and can be downloaded here: http://angryip.org/

If you can't find any ToolScopes or your network drive on this list you know that something inside your network needs to be reconfigured.

[at first press start]